Censoring Scientific Inquiry

I don’t believe in shutting down scientific inquiry, fact finding, evidence testing, hypothesis evaluation, and theory, just because it doesn’t fit my politics. I consider that unhealthy and reflects on poor mental health. I’m not a “my beliefs or the highway” person. If you show me the facts are contrary to what I believe, then I reevaluate my beliefs. Not offended. Not scared. I can be wrong. And that is what science is all about. It’s okay to be wrong in the inquiry of knowledge, verified by the pursuit of facts and evidence testing. Trying to shut down science is like trying to shut down knowledge. It’s not helpful to an informed citizenry. Ever.

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Study: Science and Religion Really Are Enemies After All [motherjones.com]

Are science and religion doomed to eternal “warfare,” or can they just get along? Philosophers, theologians, scientists, and atheists debate this subject endlessly (and often, angrily). We hear a lot less from economists on the matter, however. But in arecent paper, Princeton economist Roland Bénabou and two colleagues unveiled a surprising finding that would at least appear to bolster the “conflict” camp: Both across countries and also across US states, higher levels of religiosity are related to lower levels of scientific innovation.

“Places with higher levels of religiosity have lower rates of scientific and technical innovation, as measured by patents per capita,” comments Bénabou. He adds that the pattern persists “when controlling for differences in income per capita, population, and rates of higher education.”

That’s the most salient finding from the paper by Bénabou and his colleagues, which uses an economic model to explore how scientific innovation, religiosity, and the power of the state interact to form different “regimes.” The three kinds of regimes that they identify: a secular, European-style regime in which religion has very little policy influence and science garners great support; a repressive, theocratic regime in which the state and religion merge to suppress science; and a more intermediate, American-style regime in which religion and science both thrive, with the state supporting science and religions (mostly) trying to accommodate themselves to its findings.

It is in the process of this inquiry on the relationship between science, religion, and the state that the researchers dive into an analysis of patents, both in the United States and across the globe. And the results are pretty striking.

Click on this link to read the rest of the article:
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2014/09/religion-quashes-innovation-patents